when mischief came to town

Summer Reading: If You Liked Anne of Green Gables

Home in these books takes many forms, but it’s always the place where you just belong.

Hattie Big Sky by Kirby Larson

When 16-year-old Hattie inherits her uncle’s Minnesota homestead claim, she sets off to build a home for herself in pioneer country. (Middle grades)


When Mischief Came to Town by Katrina Nannestad

When orphaned Inge Marie comes to live with her grandmother in a little island village, she’s not sure what to expect—but what she finds is just what she needed. (Elementary)


Bright Island by Mabel Louise Robinson

Island-reared Thankful wants to be a sea captain like her grandfather, but her parents send her to boarding school on the mainland. (High School)


My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George

Sam runs away from his crowded New York City apartment to live—alone—in the Catskill Mountains. (Middle grades)


Turtle in Paradise by Jennifer L. Holm 

Sent to live with relatives in Key West during the Great Depression, 11-year-old Turtle finally starts to come out of her shell. (Middle grades)


The House at World's End by Monica Dickens

Four siblings create a home of their own in a rundown old inn when they’re sent to live with their wealthy-but-unpleasant relatives while their mother is recovering in the hospital. (Middle Grades)


Readaloud of the Week: When Mischief Came to Town

When Mischief Came to Town
By Katrina Nannestad

In brief: After her mother’s death, Inge Maria goes to live with her grandmother on a tiny Danish island where the grown-ups and her new school are stricter than she’s accustomed to. But Inge Maria’s curiosity, intelligence, and tendency to making mischief may be just what the little island community needs—and Inge Maria discovers that she has more in common with her grandmother than she expected.

 

What makes it a great readaloud: Perfectly balancing tenderness and humor, this is pretty much a textbook example of a heartwarming story. Inge Maria is utterly lovable, and the island town is peopled by funny, interesting residents. Bonus: This book is full of yummy food.

 

But be aware: Inge Maria’s mother’s death is a sad undercurrent that runs throughout the book.

 

Quotable: “Tears and laughter. Grief and joy. Loss and love. It's all right to have both. I know that now.”


Stuff We Like :: 8.19.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

around the web

The whole Michael Phelps/Katie Ledecky headline drama is nothing new. Women’s accomplishments have been so commonly overshadowed by men’s that there’s even a name for it: The Matilda Effect.

Yes, yes, yes: Why kids need monsters and magic.

The technology has changed, but social networks have been around since the Middle Ages.

My brand-new high schooler and I are definitely going to be using these exercises to kick off our new school year in a couple of weeks.

Oh, gosh, I really want to go on a road trip with Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes.

I never go anywhere without at least one emergency book. (And I’m so thankful that technology lets me carry around a chunk of library on my phone!)

 

at home | school | life

in the magazine: We’re getting started with the research for an update to our Best Cities for Homeschoolers list, and you can nominate your favorite city right here.

on the podcast: Suzanne and I are talking about socialization (which is simple) and friendships (which can be trickier). If you’re an iTunes user and you like the podcast, we’d love for you to leave a review—it’s always awesome to get a little feedback.

in the classroom: Fall classes don’t start until after Labor Day, so you’ve still got plenty of time to sign up for 12 weeks of learning adventures.

on instagram: My baby knitting (at least the bits that got done before the shower!) is a hit.

 

reading list

on my night table:

I should be reading Five Children on the Western Front, but I’m actually rereading Little Women instead because I have a tradition of reading it every year before school starts. (I’ve been doing this since kindergarten, so I can’t quit now!)

Big Bad Breakfast may be my new favorite cookbook. (And North Mississippi Eggs Benedict is my new favorite breakfast-for-dinner.)

on my 14-year-old’s night table:

The Embroidered Garden: Stitching through the Seasons of a Flower Garden (I keep waiting for her to finish with this so I can steal it, but no luck so far)

In the Spotlight (Number two in the Princess Diaries series)

The Secret of Platform 13

on my 8-year-old’s night table:

When Mischief Came to Town, but it’s practically buried under his rock collection right now, so I’m not sure if it counts.

together:

We’re still reading Magic Or Not as our morning readaloud, but we also started Johnny Tremain this week. 

 

at home

watching: Clarissa Explains It All with the kids. (It’s streaming on Hulu!)

prepping: Our new school year doesn’t start until after Labor Day, but I’m rotating books around the house to get ready—and our homeschool group picks back up next week.

knitting: I’m churning away at my Elijah, but I keep worrying that I’m not going to get the right balance of stuffing in the trunk. If you look at the other project photos on Ravelry (aren’t they adorable?), it’s obvious that there’s a golden ratio for trunk stuffing.

socializing: I’ve been having some lovely going-away meals with former students who are headed off to college this fall.