vonnegut

Library Chicken Update :: 2.21.18

Library Chicken Update :: 2.21.18

Even the flu can't keep Suzanne from short stories, bookish memoirs, surprisingly intense popular fiction, and a little Vonnegut.

Stuff We Like :: 8.12.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

around the web

Elephant and Piggie in Hamilton. Yes, please.

Being a regular reader may help you live up to two years longer. (So you’ve got plenty of time to binge-watch more television. :))

If you have ever gotten a letter from a Nigerian prince looking to make you a millionaire, you will appreciate this piece on letter-writing scams of the Victorian era.

It is really hard to see a crossword puzzle and NOT try to solve it, right?

Oh my gosh, I loved this group of children’s authors musings on whether fictional children should ever actually grow up. (I think I’m in the “no” camp, but I do like little flash-peeks into the future.)

 

at home | school | life

on the blog: How do you keep records for your homeschool? Shelli shares her method.

in the classroom: It’s a flash sale! You can save 10% if you register for your class today.

on instagram: A peek inside our weekly done list. 

on the podcast: Have you listened to the home/school/life podcast? We’d love it if you’d leave a review/rating on iTunes or share it with your friends.

from the archives: What to read after you finish all of Harry Potter?

 

reading list

on my night table:

I’m reading All the Birds in the Sky for the podcast, and I really, really like it, but I’m afraid to finish it because so many good books fall apart at the end.

I recently discovered Isabel Colegate, and I regret all the years of my reading life when I didn’t know she existed. I adored The Blackmailer (which has an Iris Murdoch-ish vibe and which is kind of darkly funny comedy of manners) and have moved on to The Shooting Party.

on my 14-year-old’s night table:

Goth Girl and the Fete Worse Than Death

The Golden Compass (I have been leaving this series ostentatiously out for her for years, so I am thrilled she picked it up!)

Storybook Toys

on my 8-year-old’s night table:

Sideways Stories from Wayside School (He liked the math problems in Sideways Arithmetic so much he wanted to read this book.)

together:

My daughter and I are reading The Letters of John and Abigail Adams together — the first of her official high school lit projects.

Magic or Not?, a lesser-known but still delightful Edward Eager book, is our current morning readaloud.

 

at home

My lovely sister-in-law is visiting from California this week, and we’ve had so much fun hanging out with Auntie Rach.

watching: Ugly Betty is streaming on Hulu now, so I am re-watching the series from start to finish. I’d forgotten how much I love Betty! I’m also obsessed with Inspector Lewis.

eating: I keep talking about tomato toast, but I can’t help it—I’m obsessed. 

knitting: I’m still in the middle of my baby knitting frenzy. On the needles: This freakishly cute little bear sweater.

listening: To John Malkovich reading me Breakfast of Champions. Talk about embarrassments of riches.


What You Should Read in High School

Great homeschool reading list for high school. #homeschool

In the summer issue of home/school/life, we're helping you figure out the best way for your family to homeschool high school — and for us, what to read is an essential piece of the puzzle. By high school, your reading list should reflect your teen’s interests, but we think these books are worthy contenders. 

The Great Gatsby
By F. Scott Fitzgerald
 

Why you should read it: Fitzgerald’s novel about love, success, and the Jazz Age is arguably the quintessential American novel, reflecting both the spirit of the American dream and the high cost paid for it.

 

Of Mice and Men
By John Steinbeck
 

Why you should read it: This simple-on-the-surface novella lends itself to deeper reading and raises compelling questions about friendship, love, and what happens when life doesn’t work out the way you’d imagined.

 

Why you should read it: Vonnegut writes in his introduction to this book that “there is nothing intelligent to say about a massacre” — and then proves himself completely wrong in the following funny, curious, heartbreaking pages that mix fact and fiction.

 

Brave New World
By Aldous Huxley
 

Why you should read it: Everyone is happy in this futuristic fantasy — and that’s terrifying. If you don’t recognize in this dystopia pieces of our own modern world — mood-lifting meds, technologically assisted everything — go back and look again.

 

Why you should read it: The brilliant, self-destructive narrator of this book is intriguingly complicated. Equal parts fascinating and repugnant, he’s the kind of complex character you can talk about for hours.

 

Why you should read it: Beckett’s masterpiece lacks sensible characters, a logical plotline, and a coherent setting, but teasing it out will uncover the genius — and hilarity — of this absurd play.

 

Why you should read it: Gleefully, manically, Heller reveals the absurdity of war through the twisty-turny stories of a group of World War II fighter pilots.

 

Why you should read it: Perhaps no author better captures the downward spiral of depression into madness than Plath does in this semi-autobiographical novel.

 

The Metamorphosis
By Franz Kafka
 

Why you should read it: Teenagers can really identify with Gregor Samsa, who wakes up one morning to find himself transformed into something else entirely, reviled by his family, and forced to question his own identity.

 

Why you should read it: If you read only one book in high school, it should be this one, which inspires all the questions that matter: Who am I? How do I live well? What is art? What is the meaning of my life?

 

Things Fall Apart
By Chinua Achebe
 

Why you should read it: The stark, simple tale of Igbo boy Okonokwo is both a richly resonant reflection of African culture and an indictment of European colonialism.

 

The Handmaid's Tale
By Margaret Atwood
 

Why you should read it: What’s terrifying about Atwood’s dystopian future, in which a totalitarian religious regime controls women’s lives completely, is how believable it is.

 

Why you should read it: What does it mean to be human? Dick’s twisted, dark tale of an android-hunter on a mission to take down rogue robots dives fearlessly into the question of self.

 

All Quiet on the Western Front
By Erich Maria Remarque
 

Why you should read it: This coming-of-age novel (set in World War I Germany) perfectly captures the experience of modern war — from the patriotic elation of joining up to the despair and disillusionment of the trenches.

 

Why you should read it: OK, this one’s not an easy read. But slow down, dig in, and let the rhythms of Faulkner’s language wash over you.

 

The Brothers Karamazov
By Fyodor Dostoevsky
 

Why you should read it: Kurt Vonnegut said that this Russian novel can teach you everything you need to know about life. I think he might be on to something.