tudors

Stuff We Like :: 7.7.17

home|school|life’s Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources. 

The summer issue is in final edits—hooray! 

around the web

This piece about aging and women in Tudor England was both hilarious and fascinating. Case in point: “Contemporaries had only to consider the wildly popular Women’s Secrets to know that old women should be viewed with suspicion. Best keep these crones away from infants, cautioned the learned text, since they could ‘poison the eyes of children lying in their cradles by their glance.’ All women were ‘entirely venomous,’ readers were told, but in earlier years menstrual blood at least served to dilute these evil humors. With the onset of the menopause, the poison was left to stew fetid in the body, with the worst toxins escaping malignantly through wrinkled eyes.”

A feminist biography mixtape (I’ve read some of these, but the rest are going on my TBR list, reasonable life expectancy considerations be damned.)

Hamilton karaoke!!

Really interesting read that doesn’t end up where you might necessarily expect: Are coding toys useful?

 

at home/school/life

on the blog: Teaching what you don’t know

one year ago: Our favorite campfire readalouds

two years ago: Organizing your reading lists

three years ago: Find the Beauty in the Mess and Chaos

 

reading list

My Library Chicken game was pretty weak this week, but I am cranking out the summer issue, so maybe I could get a point for that? My summation: The Adventures of Sally (+0, on my Kindle, a little non-Jeeves Wodehouse fun but I missed Bertie); Monster, Human, Other (+0, advance copy, but I’m looking forward to doing a full review of this); The Power of the Adolescent Brain: Strategies for Teaching Middle and High School Students (-1, returned unread, but I do still really want to read it); Mrs. Sharp's Traditions: Reviving Victorian Family Celebrations of Comfort & Joy (+0, on my shelf); The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (+1, really well written and interesting and I’m glad I read it, but I think I need to stick to Wodehouse for a little while because this made me so sad)

Homeschool reading: None! Summer issue holiday for the kids, which they are mostly using to build Hogsmeade in Minecraft

 

at home

We spent the Fourth of July getting a new hot water heater, so I am enjoying my Very Expensive Showers for the next couple of weeks until the cost-per-shower returns to more normal numbers. 

I don't want to be all self-promote-y, but if you are in Atlanta and looking for middle or high school classes, you should check out The Academy. I've been spending a lot of time helping get it up and running, and I think it has really amazing classes.


HSL Book Deal of the Day 5.23.17: My Lady Jane

My Lady Jane
By Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, Jodi Meadows

Come to this wild and weird YA historical fantasy expected a rollicking tale and lots of laughs, not historical accuracy, and you’re pretty much guaranteed an enjoyable read. Almost everyone knows the sad story of England’s nine-day queen, but this book gives her a shot an actual happy ending—if Monty Python decided to write an alternate Tudor history, this might just be the result. Fun and frothy in all the best ways.

We're highlighting our picks for best book deal of the day on the blog, but you can always find our favorite Kindle book deals here.


HSL Book Deal of the Day 5.14.17: Wolf Hall

Wolf Hall: A Novel
By Hilary Mantel

If you set out to create a totally fictional early Renaissance monarch, you would be hard-pressed to come up with a more interesting character than the real-life Henry VIII. Mantel's research bears this out in this fascinating historical fiction from the point-of-view of Thomas Cromwell, the complicated commoner who rose to power during the King's Great Matter—his efforts to divorce his first wife Catherine of Aragon—and fell from grace after the King's fourth marriage to Protestant Anne of Cleves proved unsatisfactory to his majesty. Wolf Hall focuses on Cromwell's ascent in the Tudor court and is a complicated, fascinating read rich in historical detail. Highly recommended.

We're highlighting our picks for best book deal of the day on the blog, but you can always find our favorite Kindle book deals here.


Stuff We Like :: 4.8.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

What a whirlwind week! We got back from the beach, launched our new subscription system, and got the spring issue of the magazine out. Now I think I need a spring break to recover from my spring break.

around the web

I’ve had some issues with identifying as a Southerner in my life, but I’ve always been thankful to have a handy second-person plural pronoun to pull out. Thanks, y’all.

I apologize in advance for the giant time suck that is this Tumblr imagining the life of a Muggle IT guy at Hogwarts. (But it’s hilariously awesome!)

Further proof that librarians are the greatest people in the world.

I am a little bummed that my first fictional crush (Jeff from A Solitary Blue, if you want to know) didn’t make the list, but you know you want to read about what your first fictional crush says about you.

Relevant to my interests: How to be a Tudor by Hillary Mantel in the London Review of Books (That’s practically Amy bingo if you work knitting in somewhere)

 

at home/school/life

at the magazine: Our spring issue is out, and I think it’s so great! 

on the blog: Get inspired with ideas for every single day of National Poetry Month. (We're also looking for a couple of new bloggers to add their voices to the blog.)

on instagram: Gratuitous beach photo

 

reading list

Thanks to Suzanne, my son is completely obsessing over Ottoline and the Yellow Cat. (She’s got all the Chris Riddell-illustrated books you need on your shelves in her column in the spring issue.) Also on his night table: The Warriors Greystripe's Adventures manga trilogy

My daughter refuses to give back my advanced reader copy of Click Here to Start, so I’m assuming it must be good. (She’s comparing it to Ready Player One.)

I love books about women in research science, so I was happy to pick up a copy of Lab Girl, a memoir by research scientist Hope Jahren.

 

at home

We took a road trip to Tybee Island to get a little beach time. I was worried about the weather, but it was actually perfect—warm enough to play in the water and read in the sand. (I navigated the terrain fairly well, but there were a few places where I was balancing on all three of my family members. My mom bought me some super-supportive sandals, though, which proved invaluable.)

I’ve been wanting to knit a summery little sweater, and I think Helene may be just the ticket.

Jason and I watched Mr. Robot in a couple of big binge sessions. Have you seen this show? It’s so weird and completely engrossing. (I am a sucker for an unreliable narrator, though. Also for Christian Slater, who is basically J.D. from Heathers-turned-hacker in this show.)


Stuff We Like :: 2.19.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

I think winter is probably one of my favorite times to be a homeschooler. By February, we’ve hit our groove, we’ve usually got a few awesome projects going, and it’s still cold enough so that cuddling on the couch is a featured morning activity.

around the web

It’s like Patricia is living inside my brain with this post about her son’s professed disinterest in reading. (This is one of those times where just knowing that I am not alone helps SO MUCH.)

Wait, scientists printed a human ear?

Another you-read-my-mind post: What’s up with sites creating situations where kids have to lie about their age?

The history of the world, in puns.

The In Search of Lost Time graphic novel is at the very top of my I-want-this list, y’all.

 

at home/school/life

in the magazine: We’re working on a piece about experiences every homeschool family should have. What’s on your homeschool bucket list?

on the blog: Rebecca discovers a groovy curriculum for deep thinkers.

in the archives: When I need a little jolt of inspiration, I find myself turning back to Tracy’s post on the three words every homeschool parent should know.

 

reading list

I love starting a new readaloud, and Escape from Mr. Lemoncello's Library has all the makings of a new favorite.

I may have preordered the Doctor Who coloring book.

I will read anything about the Tudors, but even if you don't share my obsession, I can wholeheartedly recommend The Lost Tudor Princess: The Life of Lady Margaret Douglas, Alison Weir’s new biography of one of family’s lesser-known members.

 

at home

Pretty much all we talk about at dinner these days is Undertale. (Are your kids obsessed, too?)

Jason and I are on the last season of Smallville. I am all over the place about this show—I am glad we watched it because some of it has been really interesting (and I really love Ollie and Lois), but it is so uneven.

We are finally easing back into meal planning (after months of kitchen exile), and I love getting to make actual food again. (The bolognese from Ruth Reichl’s My Kitchen Year is my favorite cooking project so far, no question!)

 

homeschooling highlights

We’ve started watching an episode of Good Eats together most afternoons (a lot of episodes are free on Netflix now), and it’s become one of the most fun parts of our day. I love all the random information that sends us off on tangents together.

My friend’s daughter had so much fun in this Expressive Picture Book Characters Craftsy drawing class that I signed my daughter up, too.

We have been gearing up for Leap Day with some of these activities. The calendar math puzzling has been a surprise hit. Are you doing anything special for Leap Day?


Study Topic: Mary Tudor

Study Topic: Mary Tudor

From lonely child to merciless monarch, Queen Mary I of England never seemed to catch a break. Mark the 500th anniversary of her birth (on Feb. 18, 1516) by learning more about England’s first queen regnant.