the birchbark house

Not-So-New Books: The Game of Silence

Not-So-New Books: The Game of Silence

The story of Omakayas continues in this second book in the late elementary/early middle grades series, which focuses on the changes brought about by white settlers in Native American territory.

Book Review: The Birchbark House

 

THE BIRCHBARK HOUSE
by Louise Erdich

I discovered Louise Erdrich in college and quickly became a huge fan, collecting most of her books and following her career, which is studded with awards and honors. I think her prose is beautiful and her subject matter and characters fascinating, but what I have always liked best about her is her humor. When I found out that she had written a series for young adults, I knew I had to read it to my boys. And I’ve just finished the first book: The Birchbark House

Both my boys loved this book. However, they didn’t think they would like it. My 10-year-old son took one look at the cover and groaned. I let my 7-year-old play instead of sitting on the sofa to listen, but he was in earshot. About halfway through the book, he began to sit still and listen with his brother and me. I knew they were both listening when they burst out laughing at a very funny part near the end of the book.

They were captured by the main character’s spirit. She’s a young girl, named Omakayas, or Little Frog, because her first step was a hop. She has a special way with animals, befriending two bear cubs, and she even has a crow for a pet. We learn how her family, members of the Anishinabe (now called Objibwe or Chippewa), build their homes and feed themselves. We spend a full year with them, including the very tragic winter of 1847, but the beauty and messages in this book are uplifting. We are carried along as Omakayas learns important life lessons and discovers whom she really is.

This book had everything in it that I hoped for and felt was important for my two boys to hear. First, it helped them see how the Native American tribes were affected by the arrival of white settlers. (I trust we will continue to learn about this as we continue the series.) Second, it has strong female characters. Third, it allowed them to hear beautifully written prose—something that I haven’t found in every young adult fiction book. This book also deals with loss and grief and healing in a beautiful, sensitive way. 

This book would make a perfect readaloud in your homeschool because it’s a story that every age can enjoy, but even if you don’t have young children to read it to, you should read it. It’s that good.


At Home with the Editors: January Rewind

At Home with the Editors: January Rewind

Living books to inspire a reluctant reader, learning how to take notes, and other stuff that's happening in our high school right now.

Summer Reading: If You Loved The Little House Books

Did you love the Little House series? These books — for every reading level — share the simple, everyday details of life in the American past. If you’re looking for books like Little House on the Prairie, these titles are good place to start.  

 

Your Next Picture Book:

The Snowy Day
By Ezra Jack Keats
 

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats perfectly captures the magic of a little boy’s first snow day.

 

Your Next Chapter Book

The Birchbark House
By Louise Erdrich
 

The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich does for the Native American experience what Little House did for the pioneers, chronicling the rhythms of life through a child’s eyes.

 

Your Next Readaloud:

Understood Betsy - Illustrated
By Dorothy Canfield
 

Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher tells the story of a city-reared girl who learns to love the labors of country living.

 

Your Next Teen Read:

 

The Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell is usually recommended for middle school, but the story of Karana’s self-sufficient life alone on a California island may be more deeply appreciated by older readers.

 

Your Next Grown-Up Book:

My Antonia
By Willa Cather
 

My Antonia by Willa Cather illuminates the story of the American West — and gives voice to some of the more adult difficulties of pioneer life — through the relationship of Jim and Bohemian immigrant Antonia.

 

We’re reprinting some of Amy’s summer reading series favorites from home/school/life magazine. This list appeared in our 2014 summer reading guide.