studio ghibli

How We Created Our Homeschool's Studio Ghibli Literature Class (Without a Curriculum)

How We Created Our Homeschool's Studio Ghibli Literature Class (Without a Curriculum)

We used Studio Ghibli's film adaptations of beloved children's books for a high school introduction to comparative literature. Here's how we did it — and how you can, too, no curriculum required.

At Home with the Editors: Amy’s 9th Grade Reading List

At Home with the Editors: Amy’s 9th Grade Reading List

Our 9th grade homeschool reading list is heavy on U.S. history and literature, with an effort to bring in diverse voices and stories. (Plus lots of physical science and a Studio Ghibli lit class!)

Stuff We Like :: 6.24.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

around the web

Knitting is so cool. Like, James Bond cool.

I think a homeschooler should live in Harriet the Spy’s house. And invite me over for dinner. And let me ride in the dumbwaiter. (Because of course there’s a dumbwaiter!)

This was awesome: An open letter to the female hat-wearing dog from Go, Dog, Go

Relevant to our podcast reading of Tooth and Claw (which is basically Trollope + dragons, and you should read it with us if that's your cup of tea, too): The Novels of Anthony Trollope Reviewed

It’s possible that I’m only posting this quiz because my literary mental twin was Hermione Granger, which I have ALWAYS SUSPECTED.

 

at home | school | life

in the classroom: We’re working on the fall class lineup, so let us know if there’s a class you’re looking for!

on the blog: I’m thinking of stealing Molly’s summer to-do list.

on the podcast: We’re on iTunes!

in summer reading: I love that the Studio Ghibli adaptation is making more people read When Marnie Was There because I really adore this book.

in the archives: Summer seems like the perfect time to take Amy Hood’s advice and start a family sketchbook habit.

 

reading list

on my night table: Tooth and Claw and Burr (for the podcast), From Puritanism to Postmodernism: A History of American Literature, Studio Ghibli: The Films of Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, A People’s History of the United States, Henrietta’s House, A Spring Affair (technically, this one’s spending most of its time in the pool bag)

on my 14-year-old’s night table: My Antonia, Zakka Sewing: 25 Japanese Projects for the Household, A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony, Cool Japan Guide: Fun in the Land of Manga, Lucky Cats and Ramen

on my 8-year-old’s night table: Dust. 

together: The Son of Neptune, Poetry for Young People: Robert Frost, The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, Through the Looking Glass(We seem to be doing more readalouds because they’re so portable for school at the pool.)

 

at home

watching: The last season of Scandal, even though I’m so annoyed with every single character and the writing in general at this point that I spend most of my time complaining at Jason about everything that happens

knitting: Casting on for Sleeping Cedars (I talked about my knitting for babies obsession—and shared my Ravelry info, even though it's embarrassing that I never remember to take photos, on this week's podcast. )

)playing: Nancy Drew: Secret of the Old Clock

drinking: Frosé (It’s fun to say AND fun to drink!)

listening: Moonrise Nation’s cover of Disclosure's "Latch"


Stuff We Like :: 10.23.15

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

We are busy working on Halloween costumes and top-secret birthday presents here at Casa Sharony. We may also have planned our entire Thanksgiving menu last weekend. I love fall.

around the web

I am not a theme park person, but I would make an exception for a nature-centric theme park created by Hayao Miyazaki. Wouldn’t you?

I thought I was a big Little House fan, but these scientists may have me beat. I love when different disciplines come together like this.

David Bowie paper dolls. No comment needed.

 

at home/school/life

in the magazine: Our subscription cost is going up at the end of October, so renew your subscription before then if you like the $15 price tag.

on the blog: In the spirit of Halloween reading, we hooked a reader up with some of our favorite scary books.

on pinterest: I want to make some of these super-cute leaf creatures with the kids.

 

reading list

We were late on the Pip Bartlett’s Guide to Magical Creatures craze, but my son is now completely obsessed. It’s a really fun readaloud.

I read a lot of books that don’t always end up in the magazine.A few books that I read and liked but don’t have immediate plans to review: Every Last Word, about a secret high school poetry club and a girl struggling with mental health problems; The Peddler’s Road, a Pied Piper story that I really enjoyed until it did that thing where it ends on a dramatic cliffhanger for no good reason; and The Rise and Rise of Tabitha Baird, which was fluffy, fun, and British.

Jason is reading The Name of the Wind and really digging it. I have a hard time getting into fantasy books, but it sounds like this one is worth checking out if you enjoy them.

 

at home

I’m pretending that it’s for the class I’m going to be teaching this winter, but I’m really just binge-watching Doctor Who because I can.

I started a Saroyan to knit while I’m hanging in the waiting room at physical therapy. I love the little leaves along the edge—I’m using red yarn, so it’s like knitting autumn.

I am weirdly obsessed with learning to play mah jongg. Does anybody play? I love bridge, and we inherited a gorgeous mah jongg set from my mother-in-law … but it may just be the non-weight-bearing talking.