knitting

Stuff We Like :: 7.21.17

home|school|life’s Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources. 

Apparently, finishing an issue makes me very chatty. I promise I am not enjoying a glass of frosé while writing this. (But no promises about what I’ll be doing after it’s written!)

 

around the web

The best thing I read this week was Rebecca Solnit’s talk about the time she spent roaming—both books and wilderness—during her childhood summers: “I was lucky that children were weeds, not hothouse flowers, in those days, left to our own devices, and my own devices led in two directions: north to the hills and the horses, south to the library.”

One thing you have to decide when you have a website is how you want to handle ads. I guess it’s obvious that my decision has been to limit them to the occasional sponsored post from companies whose homeschool philosophy syncs with ours, which is maybe not the most financially savvy decision but one I (mostly!) feel good about. (Obviously other people make other decisions, and those are the decisions that work best for them, so this isn’t any kind of criticism, just me musing.) But this piece about video ads taking over editorial content makes glad we’ve made the decisions we have—and that I’ve been the person with the power to make those decisions.

This is terrifying.

Great piece on how we think poetry is so much more complicated than it actually is.

Ooh, more Agatha Christie adaptations! (I have always thought Ordeal by Innocence would make a great series.)

Nice to see book clubs have remained consistent since the 1700s: “In most cases, food and alcohol in copious quantities, accompanied we may suspect by a considerable element of boisterous good humour, played an important part in the life of the book clubs.”

 

at home/school/life

on the blog: Look! I finally posted our 9th grade reading list. Now to finish our reading list for 10th grade! (It's a world history year—suggestions welcome.)

one year ago: Homeschooling High School: Mythbusters Edition

two years ago: Resources for teaching current events in your homeschool

three years ago: Mindful Homeschool: You Have All the Time You Need

 

reading list

I have basically rocked Library Chicken this week in my post-issue to-do list vacuum, so I am just going to give this whole space to my own reading list this week. I returned Just One Damned Thing After Another (first in the Chronicles of St. Mary’s series) because I was having second thoughts, but I picked it up again because some of my requests for further books in the series came in, so I read my way through the aforementioned Just One Damned Thing After Another, A Symphony of Echoes, A Second Chance, and A Trail Through Time like I was a binging a TV series. (And this would make a great series—ooh, maybe Eleanor Tomlinson could play Max!) These books are pure, history nerd, easy reading fun—the perfect back-porch-poolside-too-lazy-to-get-out-of-bed-today summer reading. Resist the urge to compare them to Connie Willis, and you should be fine. (Library Chicken score: +4)

I also recently discovered that Joan Aiken (you may remember her from The Wolves of Willoughby Chase and the Armitage family stories) wrote Jane Austen fan-fiction. How did I not know this? Suzanne said to start with Jane Fairfax (whom you may remember from Emma—she marries Frank Churchill), so I did, and it was such fun revisiting the world of Highbury and getting a different perspective on some of the characters. Some parts were better than others, and I definitely wouldn’t describe it Austenian, but it was certainly worth reading. Next up: Mansfield Park Revisited. (Library Chicken score: +1)

I am also really digging into my upcoming Greek history/literature/music/philosophy/art/science class for this fall. I’ve been reading a lot of context and criticism to help get oriented in the Classical world, and now I’m going back to the primary sources, some of which I hadn’t read since college and some of which I read before I had my inner chronology of Greek history properly in place. First up: Herodotus’s Histories, which really helped me get into the Greek mindset (and to appreciate that history has always been a narrative rather than an objective collection of facts) and Thucydides’s History of the Peloponnesian War (again, now that I have the Peloponnesian War straight in my head and a different edition, which I really liked), which goes into long, delicious (and only very occasionally tedious) detail about the war between Sparta and Athens. Is it weird that I’m starting to view Greek history as my own personal soap opera? (Library Chicken score: +2)

I’m also trying to wrap my brain around a plan for high school world history next year, so I’ve been reading with that in mind. I really enjoyed Glimpses of World History, which Jawaharlal Nehru wrote in the 1930s as a series of letters to introduce his daughter to world history—I’m always looking for a way to see world history through non-Western eyes. I also enjoyed the perspective offered by Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, which mixes science into history in a way that many traditional world history books don’t.  And I know we’re going to read Guns, Germs, and Steel, so I gave it a quick reread. (Library Chicken score: +3)

 

at home

Another summer, another friend with a baby on the way. This time I’m knitting a Tiny Tea Leaves (I love this pattern!), some Tiny Shoes, and a matching Violets Are Blue headband. (It’s a girl.) I got some lavender-ish yarn in the KnitPicks summer sale, and I think it's going to be adorable.

It is apparently our Summer of New Appliances. We recently replaced our hot water heater, and now we’re getting a new fridge. Yay?

The kids and I have taken up cross-stitching to cope with all the steamy, soggy afternoons we’ve been having this summer, and it’s a really fun project. I think I know what I am getting for Hanukkah this year! I would be really happy to get in some pool time, too, though.


Stuff We Like :: 6.23.17

home|school|life’s Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources. 

It has been raining here ALL WEEK. I'm hoping to get a little sunshine this weekend.

around the web

This cracked me up: Texts from Wonder Woman

My friend Stephanie shared this piece earlier this week, and it has some great tips for not-black parents to talk to their kids about police shootings of black people. She said something that really hit home with me—that it’s so tempting to protect our kids from things like this but that that very temptation is kind of the epitome of white privilege.

Internships and summer programs can be great experiences, but maybe there’s nothing like the classic camp counselor gig.

Relevant to my interests: Songs about libraries and librarians

 

at home/school/life

on the blog: Nanette is pretty much filling up my podcast app right now, most recently with The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel

one year ago: 31 Great Books to Inspire Young Writers

two years ago: Myers Briggs book recommendations, the tragic truth about hoverboards, the Wolf Hall audiobook, and more in this 2015 Stuff We Like roundup.

 

reading list

Suzanne inspired me to pick up some Wodehouse to get me through this week’s special election, so Jeeves features largely on my Library Chicken list: Carry On, Jeeves (+0, on my Kindle), Right Ho, Jeeves (+0, on my Kindle), Iron-Hearted Violet (+0, because it was discounted for the Kindle so I had to buy an e-back-up copy, but then I also had to read it because I love Kelly Barnhill), Lower Ed (+1, a really interesting—and kind of disturbing—look at the world of for-profit colleges), The World of Odysseus (+1, work-related), The Greeks: A Portrait of Self and Others (+1, work-related), and Courtesans and Fishcakes (+1, work-related)

In the hammock with the kids: Revenge of the Evil Librarian, A House Without Mirrors (I’m totally stealing this one when she’s done), Hamster Princess: Giant Trouble

Homeschool: How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World (This has been fascinating!)

 

at home

We’ve been watching a Supergirl/Arrow/The Flash in tandem so that we get to the big crossover episodes in all of them at the same time.

I usually try to knit everyone a new sweater for Hanukkah, which means I have to get started in the summer to get them all done! This year, we have a new family member to knit for, and I am thinking of making him this cute little doggie sweater for our winter walks. Have you knit a dog sweater? Is there a pattern you really like? (I’m thinking about Abate for my son, too, but I haven’t settled on any official people sweaters yet)

My kids asked for a food delivery subscription this summer (maybe inspired by YouTube commercials? I am not sure -- it's one of those things where they send you all the ingredients for a specific recipe), and they’ve been really adorable making dinner together twice a week. I’ve always been non-plussed by subscription meal services, but I love that it’s given them the confidence to tackle dinner regularly. (I’m still not sure why a tiny bottle of soy sauce is more user-friendly than measuring out a portion from a bigger bottle, but I think I have to accept that it just is. I don't recommend Blue Apron, though!)


Stuff We Like :: 6.9.17

home|school|life’s Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources. 

The summer issue is coming together, and—as usual!—I think it's kind of awesome.

around the web

Love this: How historians can become activists

A really excellent guide to what makes a great children’s science book

Relevant to my interests: Behind the scenes at the National Spelling Bee

I bet anyone who read this piece about spies and knitting could have guessed that it would end up in my favorite links

 

at home/school/life

on the blog: I’m talking about our (mostly successful) first year homeschooling high school

also on the blog: We tried doing the Book Deal of the Day on the blog, but people seemed pretty split on whether they liked it, so we are keeping all the book deals on the book deal page.

one year ago: The Life-Changing Magic of Embracing My Kids’ Reading Choices

two years ago: Growing Through Traveling: Independence, Confidence, and What We Become Away from Home

 

reading list

Suzanne is giving me a major inferiority complex with her Library Chicken success lately. I have been making a dent in my graphic novel/comics reading list because I’m working on a round-up for the summer issue. Highlights so far: Berlin (about the politics and problems of Weimar Berlin in the years leading up to the Nazis), Hark a Vagrant (thank you, Suzanne, for introducing me to the ultimate book nerd comic), Zita the Space Girl (feminist-y sci-fi!), and The Last Unicorn (which may be partly because of the sheer nostalgia factor). Do you have a fave graphic novel I should be sure to check out?

In my continuing effort to pick up books outside my comfort zone, I’m reading In the Garden of Iden, which I apparently put on my holds list at some point. (I sometimes log into my library account after a couple of glasses of wine, which is probably not a good idea but which has brought some interesting books into my life.) This book is technically sci-fi, about a cyborg botanist who travels to Elizabethan England to rescue specific plants from extinction, but it’s really gorgeous historical fiction plus star-crossed love story, and I’m totally okay with that. 

My son and I are diving into biographies this summer, starting with Chef Roy Choi and the Street Food Remix, which is one of the coolest picture book biographies I’ve discovered. This one corresponds nicely with our cooking shows obsession. (Next up: Creekfinding: A True Story, which is a biography of an ecosystem rather than a person.)

 

at home

We’ve been cooped up for a couple of weeks with some yucky health stuff, so we’ve been binging obscene amounts of television. The kids discovered Malcolm in the Middle, which I missed when it was actually on but which is pretty fun to watch on Netflix.

I’m knitting up a few shawl-y things to keep me warm in the classroom this fall, and I think I’m going to start with this super-snuggly one.

Everyone is talking about Wonder Woman (and fair enough—it’s about time!), but I’m already counting down to the new Murder on the Orient Express. (You should watch the trailer just for Kenneth Branagh’s spectacular mustache.)


Stuff We Like :: 2.17.17

home|school|life’s Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

Are you going to the SEA homeschool conference this spring? Suzanne and I will be there from June 1-4 giving away copies of HSL and feeling socially awkward, so please stop by and say hi if you’re there!

around the web

Just when the weight of the world feels like too much to bear, someone makes a list of book-ice cream pairings, and you know you’ll make it through.

I really love these alternative approaches to high school math.

I have so many feelings about the new James Baldwin documentary, but the main one is that everyone should go and see it.

Ursula Le Guin on "alternative facts" versus science fiction

 

at home/school/life

on the blog: A big woo-hoo to Shelli who wrapped up her year-long citizen science project with this week’s post. And Oak Meadow's winter sale is going on through the 28th!

one year ago: Rebecca reviews a curriculum for young philosophers

two years ago: Why boredom is an important part of learning

three years ago: Simple strategies to turn around a bad homeschool day

 

reading list

I’m rereading Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency so that I can watch the new television series, and I’d forgotten what a pleasure it is to make fun of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

I love when you think you’ve read everything by an author and then discover that nope, in fact, you are wrong, and there is another book. So I was delighted to discover Mischievous Meg by Astrid Lindgren, and we’ve been enjoying it as a readaloud.

My 9-year-old is reading The Wonderful Adventures of Nils. My daughter is being horrified by The Jungle for U.S. History and reading Fangirl for fun.

 

in the kitchen

Now that we’ve actually gotten back to some semblance of routine after the Tragic Ankle Breaks of 2015, I’m finding my way back to the kitchen on a regular basis. My kids mock me relentlessly, though, because I always fail Taco Tuesday—I plan tacos for Tuesday every week but something always goes sideways and we end up having them a different night. We did not have them on Tuesday, but these beef picadillo puffy tacos were much enjoyed anyway.

It’s definitely still comfort food season, and this wild rice-mushroom soup hits the spot.

Cookie of the week: Salty oatmeal chocolate chunk cookies

 

at home

I’m having trouble finding balance between staying informed and active politically (which feels important to do right now) and staying sane and available to my everyday cooking-dinner, reading-books-together, doing-the-laundry (who am I kidding? I would take any excuse to skip the laundry) life. Political happenings are like chicken pox—I’m just constantly aware of them in an uncomfortable kind of way, so much so that the rest of my life suffers, sometimes a little, sometimes a lot. And yet, how can I not pay attention every minute? How are you guys handling this? Is this just the new normal?

I’ve been watching Ken Burns’ The West while I knit at my Heaven and Space. (I love patterns like this that are almost-but-not-quite brainless, and really, who can ever have enough scarves?)


Stuff We Like :: 8.26.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

It’s a big weekend at Casa Sharony! We’re celebrating my son’s 9th birthday with the Pigeon pool games, a lot of Super Mario Maker, his favorite chocolate cake, and (I’m hoping!) lots of cuddles.

around the web

A Breaking Bad writer is not the first writer I’d think of for a new Anne of Green Gables miniseries, but I’ll obviously be watching this when it comes to Netflix.

This cracked me up. (Get it together, Joan of Arc’s parents!)

Secret libraries!

 

at home | school | life

on the blog: I am so inspired by Carrie’s round-up of resources for talking about race with our kids.

on the podcast: While you’re reading this, Suzanne and I will be discussing how to handle it when your homeschooler just plain resists doing the work.

in the classroom: The first day of classes is coming soon! Register now.

on instagram: We might need a bigger art room.

 

reading list

on my night table: Five Children on the Western Front, From the Beast to the Blonde: Fairy Tales and Their Tellers, Zero K

on my 14-year-old’s night table: FukuFuku: Kitten Tales, Princess Jellyfish, Marilee

on my 8-year-old’s night table: Knight’s Castle, B Is for Betsy

together: Johnny Tremain, Henry and Ribsy, The View from Saturday

 

at home

homeschooling: Our homeschool group picked back up this week, and I’m kind of bummed that it doesn’t seem like a good fit for my daughter anymore. Finding a group is so hard, and going back to the drawing board for high school is really stressing me out.

watching: Star Trek: Deep Space Nine because people keep telling me it’s the most philosophically interesting Star Trek

knitting: My Elijah is adorable, but I somehow picked up the stitches for the left leg in the wrong place and had to rip that whole leg out and start over. If you pay attention to where you’re picking up stitches instead of getting distracted by Hathaway’s backstory on Inspector Lewis, this patten is surprisingly simple.


Stuff We Like :: 8.19.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

around the web

The whole Michael Phelps/Katie Ledecky headline drama is nothing new. Women’s accomplishments have been so commonly overshadowed by men’s that there’s even a name for it: The Matilda Effect.

Yes, yes, yes: Why kids need monsters and magic.

The technology has changed, but social networks have been around since the Middle Ages.

My brand-new high schooler and I are definitely going to be using these exercises to kick off our new school year in a couple of weeks.

Oh, gosh, I really want to go on a road trip with Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes.

I never go anywhere without at least one emergency book. (And I’m so thankful that technology lets me carry around a chunk of library on my phone!)

 

at home | school | life

in the magazine: We’re getting started with the research for an update to our Best Cities for Homeschoolers list, and you can nominate your favorite city right here.

on the podcast: Suzanne and I are talking about socialization (which is simple) and friendships (which can be trickier). If you’re an iTunes user and you like the podcast, we’d love for you to leave a review—it’s always awesome to get a little feedback.

in the classroom: Fall classes don’t start until after Labor Day, so you’ve still got plenty of time to sign up for 12 weeks of learning adventures.

on instagram: My baby knitting (at least the bits that got done before the shower!) is a hit.

 

reading list

on my night table:

I should be reading Five Children on the Western Front, but I’m actually rereading Little Women instead because I have a tradition of reading it every year before school starts. (I’ve been doing this since kindergarten, so I can’t quit now!)

Big Bad Breakfast may be my new favorite cookbook. (And North Mississippi Eggs Benedict is my new favorite breakfast-for-dinner.)

on my 14-year-old’s night table:

The Embroidered Garden: Stitching through the Seasons of a Flower Garden (I keep waiting for her to finish with this so I can steal it, but no luck so far)

In the Spotlight (Number two in the Princess Diaries series)

The Secret of Platform 13

on my 8-year-old’s night table:

When Mischief Came to Town, but it’s practically buried under his rock collection right now, so I’m not sure if it counts.

together:

We’re still reading Magic Or Not as our morning readaloud, but we also started Johnny Tremain this week. 

 

at home

watching: Clarissa Explains It All with the kids. (It’s streaming on Hulu!)

prepping: Our new school year doesn’t start until after Labor Day, but I’m rotating books around the house to get ready—and our homeschool group picks back up next week.

knitting: I’m churning away at my Elijah, but I keep worrying that I’m not going to get the right balance of stuffing in the trunk. If you look at the other project photos on Ravelry (aren’t they adorable?), it’s obvious that there’s a golden ratio for trunk stuffing.

socializing: I’ve been having some lovely going-away meals with former students who are headed off to college this fall.


Stuff We Like :: 8.12.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

around the web

Elephant and Piggie in Hamilton. Yes, please.

Being a regular reader may help you live up to two years longer. (So you’ve got plenty of time to binge-watch more television. :))

If you have ever gotten a letter from a Nigerian prince looking to make you a millionaire, you will appreciate this piece on letter-writing scams of the Victorian era.

It is really hard to see a crossword puzzle and NOT try to solve it, right?

Oh my gosh, I loved this group of children’s authors musings on whether fictional children should ever actually grow up. (I think I’m in the “no” camp, but I do like little flash-peeks into the future.)

 

at home | school | life

on the blog: How do you keep records for your homeschool? Shelli shares her method.

in the classroom: It’s a flash sale! You can save 10% if you register for your class today.

on instagram: A peek inside our weekly done list. 

on the podcast: Have you listened to the home/school/life podcast? We’d love it if you’d leave a review/rating on iTunes or share it with your friends.

from the archives: What to read after you finish all of Harry Potter?

 

reading list

on my night table:

I’m reading All the Birds in the Sky for the podcast, and I really, really like it, but I’m afraid to finish it because so many good books fall apart at the end.

I recently discovered Isabel Colegate, and I regret all the years of my reading life when I didn’t know she existed. I adored The Blackmailer (which has an Iris Murdoch-ish vibe and which is kind of darkly funny comedy of manners) and have moved on to The Shooting Party.

on my 14-year-old’s night table:

Goth Girl and the Fete Worse Than Death

The Golden Compass (I have been leaving this series ostentatiously out for her for years, so I am thrilled she picked it up!)

Storybook Toys

on my 8-year-old’s night table:

Sideways Stories from Wayside School (He liked the math problems in Sideways Arithmetic so much he wanted to read this book.)

together:

My daughter and I are reading The Letters of John and Abigail Adams together — the first of her official high school lit projects.

Magic or Not?, a lesser-known but still delightful Edward Eager book, is our current morning readaloud.

 

at home

My lovely sister-in-law is visiting from California this week, and we’ve had so much fun hanging out with Auntie Rach.

watching: Ugly Betty is streaming on Hulu now, so I am re-watching the series from start to finish. I’d forgotten how much I love Betty! I’m also obsessed with Inspector Lewis.

eating: I keep talking about tomato toast, but I can’t help it—I’m obsessed. 

knitting: I’m still in the middle of my baby knitting frenzy. On the needles: This freakishly cute little bear sweater.

listening: To John Malkovich reading me Breakfast of Champions. Talk about embarrassments of riches.


Stuff We Like :: 8.5.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

around the web

Let’s take a moment to appreciate Roald Dahl’s contributions to the world of food.

Finally, a fashion “get the look” I can get behind.

I wouldn’t say that I’ve been running around gloating about passing The Strand’s new hire book test, but some of the people I live with might. (You should take it, too!)

Maybe it is all the Hamilton, but this article about the secret language of colonial handwriting was fascinating.

 And speaking of history, this was kind of depressing.

This article about the Olympics Refugee Team made me want to cry, hug my children, and cheer these guys on. (I would love to see them earn a medal.)

 

at home | school | life

on the website: So I always want to share good book deals when I see them, but I also stress about cluttering up people’s feeds with stuff they don’t want to see. I finally bit the bullet and set up a page on the website where we can highlight notable books on sale. (Don’t worry — this isn’t one of those crazy every-book-that’s-cheap lists — we’re only listing books we genuinely recommend for your reading list. And if you’re not interested in book sales, you never have to see it!) 

on the blog: Sometimes you just want to look at pretty school supplies and imagine how they could make your homeschool so shiny and organized.

in the classroom: Registration for fall classes is open!

on the podcast: I brag a little about getting my AP U.S. History syllabus approved this week, but it was all very exciting.

in the magazine: We’re starting the (months-long!) process of collecting data to update our Best Cities for Homeschool Families, and we’d love to hear from other homeschoolers about their favorite places to homeschool.

 

reading list

on my night table: All the Birds in the Sky (our next podcast read pick), The Memoirs of Aaron Burr (resistance was futile), Don’t Tell the Grown-Ups: The Subversive Power of Children’s Literature, The House of the Seven Gables

on my 14-year-old’s night table: A Separate Peace (I encouraged her to pick this one up, but she’s really not digging it), The House on Mango Street, The Princess Bride

on my 8-year-old’s night table: Sideways Arithmetic from Wayside School, The Complete Brambly Hedge

together: The Blood of Olympus (we have successfully binged this whole series over the summer), The BFG

 

at home

watching: Like everyone else in the world, we binged Stranger Things. #bringbackbarb

eating: I made a giant batch of blueberry jam to give as favors at my sis-in-law’s baby shower.

knitting: My daughter and I have teamed up on a project: I’m knitting the Snug as a Bug sleep sack, and she’s making a matching pea shoot hat to make a sweet pea baby sleep set.

listening: Invisibilia


Stuff We Like :: 7.8.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

The summer issue is out! And we’re pretty much happy dancing right to the pool for the rest of the summer.

around the web

Obviously, I’m totally a Mary Anne.

I cried reading this story about a Jewish family’s tea can treasure.

If you are having a rough day, I suggest you go and read about these underwear-stealing Scottish birds.

I thought this history of voracious reading was fascinating.

Elie Wiesel on All Things Considered. 

 

at home | school | life

in the magazine: Did we mention the summer issue is out?

in the classroom: The fall schedule is making me wish I were still in high school.

on the podcast: Suzanne and I are talking about how homeschool moms don’t get sick days.

on the blog: To go with our summer camping feature, a roundup of our favorite campfire readalouds.

on instagram: So, yeah, my whole life pretty much did revolve around the summer issue this week. 

 

reading list

on my night table: Baby Beanies: Happy Hats to Knit for Little Heads, Burr, A Super Upsetting Cookbook About Sandwiches, The Last Painting of Sara de Vos: A Novel

on my 14-year-old’s night table: Yotsuba&!, The Raven Boys, Fifty Dresses That Changed the World, One-Yard Wonders

on my 6-year-old’s night table: Encyclopedia Brown, Boy Detective

together: The Westing Game (because talking to Suzanne reminded me how much I love it), The Mark of Athena

 

at home

watching: Children playing in the pool

knitting: Sleeping Cedars, Baby Uggs (these are going to be my go-to bootie henceforth, and the pattern’s free!), and Elijah

playing: Badminton, badly

eating: Pork and pineapple tacos

listening: To the cicadas all night long


Stuff We Like :: 6.24.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

around the web

Knitting is so cool. Like, James Bond cool.

I think a homeschooler should live in Harriet the Spy’s house. And invite me over for dinner. And let me ride in the dumbwaiter. (Because of course there’s a dumbwaiter!)

This was awesome: An open letter to the female hat-wearing dog from Go, Dog, Go

Relevant to our podcast reading of Tooth and Claw (which is basically Trollope + dragons, and you should read it with us if that's your cup of tea, too): The Novels of Anthony Trollope Reviewed

It’s possible that I’m only posting this quiz because my literary mental twin was Hermione Granger, which I have ALWAYS SUSPECTED.

 

at home | school | life

in the classroom: We’re working on the fall class lineup, so let us know if there’s a class you’re looking for!

on the blog: I’m thinking of stealing Molly’s summer to-do list.

on the podcast: We’re on iTunes!

in summer reading: I love that the Studio Ghibli adaptation is making more people read When Marnie Was There because I really adore this book.

in the archives: Summer seems like the perfect time to take Amy Hood’s advice and start a family sketchbook habit.

 

reading list

on my night table: Tooth and Claw and Burr (for the podcast), From Puritanism to Postmodernism: A History of American Literature, Studio Ghibli: The Films of Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, A People’s History of the United States, Henrietta’s House, A Spring Affair (technically, this one’s spending most of its time in the pool bag)

on my 14-year-old’s night table: My Antonia, Zakka Sewing: 25 Japanese Projects for the Household, A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony, Cool Japan Guide: Fun in the Land of Manga, Lucky Cats and Ramen

on my 8-year-old’s night table: Dust. 

together: The Son of Neptune, Poetry for Young People: Robert Frost, The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, Through the Looking Glass(We seem to be doing more readalouds because they’re so portable for school at the pool.)

 

at home

watching: The last season of Scandal, even though I’m so annoyed with every single character and the writing in general at this point that I spend most of my time complaining at Jason about everything that happens

knitting: Casting on for Sleeping Cedars (I talked about my knitting for babies obsession—and shared my Ravelry info, even though it's embarrassing that I never remember to take photos, on this week's podcast. )

)playing: Nancy Drew: Secret of the Old Clock

drinking: Frosé (It’s fun to say AND fun to drink!)

listening: Moonrise Nation’s cover of Disclosure's "Latch"


Stuff We Like :: 6.17.16

home|school|life's Friday roundup of the best homeschool links, reads, tools, and other fun stuff has lots of ideas and resources.

We are definitely getting into our summer groove here! Jason was off on his big annual fishing trip last week, so the kids and I had a little staycation fun (lots of baking, a Back to Future marathon, many hours of Mario, and daily kung fu parades). Now we’re basically just trying to squeeze in every possible minute of pool time.

around the web

Apparently I am not the only person who thinks this election season feels a lot like an 80s wrestling match. (Of course, now I'm going around making everyone read "The World of Wrestling.")

This: It’s nice to be polite, it’s fine to be a good sport sometimes, but it’s also perfectly, 100 percent, totally okay to get angry, daughters of the world.

I really love stories about snarky writers. Is it wrong that this article totally made me wish I could have been friends with D.H. Lawrence?

Every single writer who has ever tried to make a living writing should read this.

If someone writes a piece on the awesomeness of Wayside School, I’m going to share it.

 

at home | school | life

on the website: A few people have asked about getting email notifications when a new blog post goes up. (You guys are so nice!) We have added a Bloglovin’ sign-up in the right-hand sidebar—if you put in your email address, you’ll get an email whenever there’s a new post.

on the blog: The answer to the question I get asked the most: How do you work full-time and homeschool your kids?

on the podcast: Tune in Monday for our new episode—Suzanne and I are talking about summer homeschooling, dropping your kids off for a week on a college campus, Hamilton, baby knitting, Greensleeves by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, and more.

in the magazine: Everything’s starting to come together with the summer issue, and I know I say this every time, but I think it may be my favorite issue yet.

 

reading list

on my night table: Basically everything that was on it last week, plus The New Yorker’s fiction issue

on my 14-year-old’s night table: Bloomability, Seraphina, A Royal Pain (I was so excited to see this Ellen Conford book at the library—I’m hoping it holds up well because I loved it as a kid)

on my 6-year-old’s night table: Comet in Moominland, Karlson on the Roof (this one was a surprise hit from the library—he's already read it twice)

together: The Lost Hero (still), Mr. Lemoncello’s Library Olympics

 

at home

watching: Overly Sarcastic’s Classics Summarized, which are possibly my new most favorite thing ever

knitting: Tell me your favorite baby knitting patterns because I’m going to be an aunt! There are many, many reasons to be excited about this, but baby knitting is pretty high on the list.

playing: The Adventure Time version of Munchkin, which has a lot of weird rules that I can’t seem to keep up with but which my children love

eating: no-churn salted caramel bourbon ice cream on the front porch

listening: The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration (This is keeping me moving during physical therapy, which is starting to feel like it will never end)